Great British Bee Count - the results

In 2015, we did the count in May to find out about bees that appear earlier in the year. Here are the highlights from last year.

In 2015, we did the count in May to find out about bees that appear earlier in the year. Here are the highlights from last year.

From the Scillies to Shetland

See where bees were spotted near you

View the map

 

1. Almost half of you reported seeing a white-tailed bumblebee. This group includes the garden & buff-tailed species (49%)

2. Honey bees were a close second, seen in gardens and public spaces across the country (48.6%)

3. Our count was in May - so lots of you saw the early bumblebee. A sign that spring has sprung (25%)

4. Female red-tailed bumblebees took fourth. One of the UK's largest bumblebees (20%)

5. A UK resident since 2001, tree bumblebee numbers have rocketed. They often nest in bird boxes (19%)

 

Cotoneaster was four times more attractive to bees than any other plant during May. Be careful when choosing a variety to plant though, as some are very invasive.
School grounds were more popular than parks and gardens for bees with an average of 11 bees seen per count, showing that schools are doing great work to improve habitats.
 

Your pictures

Over 4,800 photos were taken providing some fantastic data for the scientists. Here are just a few of them:


Female hairy-footed flower bee by Debbie Wright (Devizes, Wiltshire)

Red mason bee by Carl De Groot (Uxbridge, London)

Female tree bumblebee by Julian Rosser (Cardiff, Wales)

See more photos

A Case of Mistaken Identity

During the count quite a few people mixed up the male hairy-footed flower bee and the common carder bee. Entomologist Stuart Roberts and Buglife give these tips on how to tell the difference:

Male hairy-footed flower bee
  • Fast, darting flight
  • Hovers in front of flowers
  • Solitary bee
Common carder bee
  • Slow, "bumbling" flight
  • Shaggy hair
  • Social bee
 
This year's queen bee is Sarah Brandon from Gloucester. Sarah has been busy adding bee-friendly plants to her garden and reported that a firm favourite for our buzzing garden friends is the aptly named jasmine beesanium.

Start planning your bee-friendly garden >

 

From the Scillies to Shetland

See where bees were spotted near you

View the map

-------------------------------------------

1. Almost half of you reported seeing a white-tailed bumblebee. This group includes the garden & buff-tailed species (49%)

2. Honey bees were a close second, seen in gardens and public spaces across the country (48.6%)

3. Our count was in May - so lots of you saw the early bumblebee. A sign that spring has sprung (25%)

4. Female red-tailed bumblebees took fourth. One of the UK's largest bumblebees (20%)

5. A UK resident since 2001, tree bumblebee numbers have rocketed. They often nest in bird boxes (19%)

 

Cotoneaster was four times more attractive to bees than any other plant during May. Be careful when choosing a variety to plant though, as some are very invasive.

 

School grounds were more popular than parks and gardens for bees with an average of 11 bees seen per count, showing that schools are doing great work to improve habitats.

Your pictures

Over 4,800 photos were taken providing some fantastic data for the scientists. Here are just a few of them:

Female hairy-footed flower bee by Debbie Wright (Devizes, Wiltshire)

Red mason bee by Carl De Groot (Uxbridge, London)

Female tree bumblebee by Julian Rosser (Cardiff, Wales)

See more photos

A Case of Mistaken Identity

During the count quite a few people mixed up the male hairy-footed flower bee and the common carder bee. Entomologist Stuart Roberts and Buglife give these tips on how to tell the difference:

Male hairy-footed flower bee
  • Fast, darting flight
  • Hovers in front of flowers
  • Solitary bee
Common carder bee
  • Slow, "bumbling" flight
  • Shaggy hair
  • Social bee

This year's queen bee is Sarah Brandon from Gloucester. Sarah has been busy adding bee-friendly plants to her garden and reported that a firm favourite for our buzzing garden friends is the aptly named jasmine beesanium.

Plan your bee-friendly garden >

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