Great British Bee Count - the results

"Bees are beautiful, fascinating and inspiring insects and we need as many people as possible to contribute to the Great British Bee Count to help us better understand how they are faring in 21st Century Britain. Be warned - you may become obsessed with their amazing lifecycles and behaviour!"

- Steven Falk, author of Field Guide to the Bees of Great Britain and Ireland

 

Help save our bees - sign our petition to ban bee-harming pesticides.

"Bees are beautiful, fascinating and inspiring insects and we need as many people as possible to contribute to the Great British Bee Count to help us better understand how they are faring in 21st Century Britain. Be warned - you may become obsessed with their amazing lifecycles and behaviour!"

- Steven Falk, author of Field Guide to the Bees of Great Britain and Ireland

 

Help save our bees - sign our petition to ban bee-harming pesticides.

From the Scillies to Shetland

See where bees were spotted near you

View the map

 

1. White-tailed bumblebee

2. Honey bee

3. Early bumblebee

4. Tree bumblebee

5. Red-tailed bumblebee

 

 
Cotoneaster
Frequently reported as having 11 or more bees on this plant at a time, Cotoneaster was a firm favourite with bees at this time of year. If you are thinking of adding this plant to your garden, do your research as some varieties can be highly invasive.
 
Lacy phacelia
Coming in at a close second, lacy phacelia’s beautiful purple flowers attracted an average of 10 bees within the minute counting window. It’s a great wildflower that will provide lots of food for hungry bees.
 
Ceanothus
Ceanothus produces mainly blue flowers and is often planted as part of hedgerows. Those of you counting bees on this plant saw an average of 9 bee visitors within the one minute period.
 
Buddleja
A favourite with butterflies as well, buddleja had an average of 8 visitors within the counting time. Buddleja is famous for occupying many a railway line.
Wisteria
These beautiful climbers not only look very impressive and smell divine, they are also a firm favourite with bees. An average of 8 bees were attracted to this plant within the one minute counting period.
Many of you spotted lots of different types of bees in your gardens this year, with 56% of participants seeing 3 or more different types of bee. This is an increase of 14% on last year.
Over 15,000 people helped to spot bees this year, and not just in gardens; keen walker Ed Sturley even spotted white-tailed bumblebees on the peaks of Snowdonia.
 

Your pictures

Over 14,000 photos were taken providing some fantastic data for the scientists. Here are just a few of them:


Early bumblebee - spotted by Joanne Holland in Newcastle

Early mining bee - spotted by Mark Redford in Warrington

Ashy mining bee - spotted by Kate Evans in Bristol

See more photos

White-tailed bumblebees

During the count we asked you to look for white-tailed bumblebees. This is a category of bee which includes the buff-tailed bumblebee and the garden bumblebee, plus others that look very similar. Here are some tips on how to tell them apart.

View the factsheet (PDF)

Download results

All records are made available through the National Biodiversity Network. We encourage researchers to use photos collected through the Great British Bee Count to verify records.

National Biodiversity Network Data Sharing Partner Badge

From the Scillies to Shetland

See where bees were spotted near you

View the map

1. White-tailed bumblebee

2. Honey bee

3. Early bumblebee

4. Tree bumblebee

5. Red-tailed bumblebee

 

 
Cotoneaster
Frequently reported as having 11 or more bees on this plant at a time, Cotoneaster was a firm favourite with bees at this time of year. If you are thinking of adding this plant to your garden, do your research as some varieties can be highly invasive.
 
Lacy phacelia
Coming in at a close second, lacy phacelia’s beautiful purple flowers attracted an average of 10 bees within the minute counting window. It’s a great wildflower that will provide lots of food for hungry bees.
 
Ceanothus
Ceanothus produces mainly blue flowers and is often planted as part of hedgerows. Those of you counting bees on this plant saw an average of 9 bee visitors within the one minute period.
 
Buddleja
A favourite with butterflies as well, buddleja had an average of 8 visitors within the counting time. Buddleja is famous for occupying many a railway line.
 
Wisteria
These beautiful climbers not only look very impressive and smell divine, they are also a firm favourite with bees. An average of 8 bees were attracted to this plant within the one minute counting period.

Many of you spotted lots of different types of bees in your gardens this year, with 56% of participants seeing 3 or more different types of bee. This is an increase of 14% on last year.

Over 15,000 people helped to spot bees this year, and not just in gardens; keen walker Ed Sturley even spotted white-tailed bumblebees on the peaks of Snowdonia.

 

Your pictures

Over 14,000 photos were taken providing some fantastic data for the scientists. Here are just a few of them:


Early bumblebee - spotted by Joanne Holland in Newcastle

Early mining bee - spotted by Mark Redford in Warrington

Ashy mining bee - spotted by Kate Evans in Bristol

See more photos

White-tailed bumblebees

During the count we asked you to look for white-tailed bumblebees. This is a category of bee which includes the buff-tailed bumblebee and the garden bumblebee, plus others that look very similar. Here are some tips on how to tell them apart.

View the factsheet (PDF)

Download results

All records are made available through the National Biodiversity Network. We encourage researchers to use photos collected through the Great British Bee Count to verify records.

National Biodiversity Network Data Sharing Partner Badge